Ad for Pennsylvania tourism.

August, 1952.

The next verse reads,
In case you couldn’t guess,
Our copy-writer’s life is a mess.

Ad for Travelers insurance.

August, 1952.

Illustration by Andre Durenceau.

Ad for Sinclair Oil.

August, 1952.

Kodachrome by David S. Boyer.

From “Westminster, World Series of Dogdom,” National Geographical, January, 1954.

Champion Foray’s Fancy, a Great Dane, Keeps Watch over Sleeping Companions. German Nobles Used the Breed as Bodyguards

Map drawn by Robert W. Northrop.

From “Cliff Dwellers of the Bering Sea,” National Geographic, January, 1954.

King Island Dots the Bering Sea

Only 2 1/4 square miles in area, the island lies 85 miles northwest of Nome, Alaska, and 110 miles south of the Arctic Circle. A village of 150 Eskimos perches on its southern cliff.

Kodachrome by Juan Muñoz.

From “Cliff Dwellers of the Bering Sea,” National Geographic, January, 1954.

With Alaska’s Flag Hastily Flown in Reverse, the Author’s Wife Signals a Plane onto Ukivok’s Red-streamed Runway

King Islanders chopped away pressure ridges on sea ice to smooth 1,200-foot emergency strip. When turbulent air prevented a landing, the pilot dropped supplies from 1,000 feet. Some, falling on floes, drifted to sea. At the same time of the author’s visit, only three airplane landings had ever been made on King Island.

Ad for Ireland tourism.

January, 1954.

Kodachrome by David S. Boyer.

From “Westminster, World Series of Dogdom,” National Geographical, January, 1954.

Through the centuries the big coursing hounds were reserved largely for the wealthy, but the common people had their own dogs, the lively little terriers. Named after the Latin word for earth, terra, these burrowing dogs helped their masters keep down rats and other vermin.

Miniature Schnauzers were developed in Germany. Though they preserve an instinct for ratting, these four serve primarily as pets. Champion Gay Knight, Lovely Lady, Gentleman Jack, and Champion Lucky Lady come from Phil-Mar Kennels.

Kodachrome by Robert F. Sisson.

From “Westminster, World Series of Dogdom,” National Geographical, January, 1954.

Bulldog’s Sour Look Veils a Sunny Disposition

To equip the Bulldog for bullbaiitng in the 17th century, English breeders pulled his lower jaw out, pushed his nose back. Doc’s Mister and Ellenberger’s Ambergris are gruff only when demanding the best seats for TV.

Precious Ambergris.

Kodachrome by David S. Boyer.

From “Westminster, World Series of Dogdom,” National Geographical, January, 1954.

Pequa Don Eats His Winner’s Reward

Donnie, an English Springer Spaniel, watches over children at home and serves his master as a gun dog. To Patty Matson, a member of his family, he is a hero for having saved her brother from drowning.